Classes Offered

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Conference Clips

 The 2015 SAQA conference opened on Thursday evening with the Ice Breaker event and opening remarks.  Everyone had a few minutes to follow the directions of Lyric Kinard in making an intuitive piece of art with just the materials in the center of the table.  Halfway through we switched tables and pieces of art.  I'm not sure these were masterpieces but it got everyone talking and laughing together.  Fiberlandia had been launched!
 Friday started bright and early at 8:30 AM.  Not sure we were all ready for the bright part! SAQA president, Kris Sazaki, got our attention and enthusiasm level to a high point in no time, though. Our first speaker was Namita Gupta Wiggers.  Quilt: A rose by any other name does not smell as sweet had us all thinking about the quilt as a deeper form of art than just a lovely piece hanging on a wall.

I attended two break-out sessions that day as well. Carolyn Higgins talked about mastering social media as an effective tool for marketing your work.  I can check some of her suggestions off the list but it looks like I should bite the bullet and have an actual web site, in addition to this blog.  Ugh!  Sometimes we forget that as artists the marketing part can take as much time as the making of the art. I did love her comment that Pinterest is like potato chips for the eyes.

The second session was an excellent presentation by Sue Reno on how artists can develop and maintain a daily artistic practice.  Besides her own suggestions, she shared the remarks from 16 successfully practicing art quilters and what worked for them.  Many of the ideas I already employ to get me into the studio and working but some were new things to try.  It was very helpful to hear how some had many other responsibilities to juggle and still made time for studio work.

Rosalie Dace of South Africa led a panel of international students after lunch.  They talked about what influenced their artistic style and how they, too, found balance between their creative lives and their studies and home life.  The slides of their work were really enjoyable.


That evening was the Maker Space event in a banquet room of the Doubletree Hotel.  There were 10 tables set up with someone at each demonstrating a technique of some sort.  I was one of the demonstrators, doing small, simple landscapes using fusible web.  This is me talking until my voice was hoarse.  It must have been a success because the noise level in the room was very high!

 Below is my friend Georgia French demonstrating needle-felting by machine.  She said her machines were humming away all evening.  It was a fast, and long, 3 hours.

The next morning we had an outstanding talk by artist Maria Shell who lives in a remote area of Alaska.  Despite that, she has been prolifically showing in her own state well as across the country.  She gave us many good tips to get into shows but the main three were:  1 - Do the work. Have at least 10 to 20 pieces ready to be entered before starting.  2 - Enter as many shows as you can that accept fiber art.  Follow the entry directions to the letter. 3 - Don't be discouraged by rejection.  She only gets accepted to about 40 percent of the shows she applies for.  She does think Visions has a special rejection stamp with her name on it, though.

We also had a panel of local textile artists from the Oregon College of Art and Craft.  The slides of their work were fascinating and the wide variety of artistic interpretations was delightful.  It will be fun to follow their progress as they work through to graduation.  The students are Molly Eno, Melina Bishop, Kaylin Francis and Tyler Peterson.

The afternoon was open to anyone who wanted to take a tour of a part of Portland.  I took one car load to the Alberta Arts District in north Portland.  We had a lovely lunch at a French-style bistro and then explored the shops and galleries up and down the street.  Here is Sherrie enjoying a shady moment in the doorway of the Guardino Gallery.  We loved having the sun out the whole weekend so out out-of-state visitors could really enjoy the natural beauty of Oregon.  One group even took a trip up the Columbia River Gorge to Multnomah Falls.


We got back in time for a nap (yes!) and time to freshen up for the Wild About SAQA dinner and silent auction of small quilts.  The dinner selections were delicious and then the fun began.  Everyone had some time before and during dinner to bid on their favorite pieces.  There were over 100 donations so it took some time to look and decide and then keep up on your bid sheets.
Here are two examples of the selections.  Each one was originally 6" by 8" and then they were matted and put into plastic sleeves.  The Mt. Hood rendition is mine which I made to look like the badges that the "Portland experts" wore all weekend.  The second one is a lovely little piece made by Terry Grant.

Sunday ended with remarks by Beth Smith and Charlotte Bird on the inner workings of Quilt Visions and how to successfully enter the show.  Unless you have actually mounted and curated a show, you have no idea how much work they can be. 

We ended the conference with a panel of four local artists led by Jeannette Di Nicolis Meyer.  They had actual pieces there to see along with slides of their work.  They were Sidnee Snell, Jean Wells Keenan, Bonnie Bucknam and Sheila Finzer.  Although I know all four women, it was still interesting to hear their stories of how they got to the level of achievement that they enjoy today.  No one is resting on their laurels though and we can all hope to see more of their work in the future.

And, this is now, officially, the longest post I've ever written.

Monday, May 11, 2015

Rift Valley moves on

Rift Valley has been accepted into the Around Oregon Annual at The Arts Center in Corvallis.  The show opens Friday, May 29th with a reception and juror's talk from 5:30 to 7:30 PM.  There is also a Brown Bag Artist Talk at noon on June 4th.  The show runs through July 11th.  The Arts Center is located at 700 SW Madison, Corvallis, OR.  For more information go to www.theartscenter.net
Currently this piece is being shown at the last venue for the statewide SAQA traveling show, Exploring Layers.  This show is up at the Artist In Residence gallery at Pioneer Place in Portland, next to the Mark Wooley Gallery. It really is a big beautiful space and the show looks great there.  That show is on display through May 18th. Stop in if you are in downtown Portland before then.  Here are some images from the show.








Monday, May 4, 2015

Katano dying workshop


The 2015 SAQA Fiberlandia conference is over.  As they always are, the conference was alternately energizing and exhausting.  There is so much to take in, learn from and be inspired by that it usually takes several days to decompress and filter all the experiences through one's brain.  I was pretty tired by the time I got to yesterday's afternoon workshop with Ana Lisa Hedstrom but I wouldn't have missed it for anything.  Ana Lisa did a marvelous job of passing along the very beginning skills of doing katano shibori dying which is using stitching (in this case machine stitching) to act as a resist to the fabric dye.  I was too busy stitching to get a picture of everyone bent over their machines but here we are bringing the samples up out of the dye pots.
We couldn't wait to get all those little sodden pieces distributed to the correct person and start ripping open the stitches.  The four hours went by in a flash.  Below are my four samples that were rinsed out once again today and ironed flat.  My stitching lines on the two tan pieces are pretty light but I thought the blue samples came out great.  They look like x-rays of plants.  Can you see the meadow grasses on the far right and the fan palm leaf next to it? Pretty cool. I can't wait to try more of this.



Monday, April 27, 2015

Flying My Freak Flag

I spent some time yesterday doing a trial run of my installation piece that will be part of the Moving Outside exhibit at Portland's Trinity Episcopal Cathedral starting on Wednesday, April 29.  Of course, the tree I will be working with is going to be completely different than this one in my front yard, but I had to see exactly how my vision might work out.  It turned out to be easier than I was expecting.  Most of the vintage linens are tied together with a light green ribbon but I discovered that pins will be needed in some spots. About now I was wondering what the neighbors were thinking.

My piece is called Fragments and I am writing small words or phrases on the ribbons that are recollections of childhood and general life experiences, some good, some bad.  I trialed the larger peach ribbon and decided it is too big.  The smaller green ribbon is better but I did go today and buy one that is just one size wider. It does show up better.
The only change I need to make in the actual installation is to cover the round doily with another corner of lace.  The way it looks here it reminds me of a lost hubcap that someone has nailed to a tree.  Good thing I tried this at home first.  Once the show is hung in the Cathedral courtyard I will post pictures of my actual piece and the other pieces as well.

On another note, the badges for the volunteers at the SAQA conference, starting Thursday, are done and ready to be delivered.  Each one came out slightly different from the next one.  I actually made 13 because one of them was my prototype on which I made all my mistakes.  I hope everyone enjoys wearing them.


Thursday, April 2, 2015

SAQA and Fiberlandia


It's only a few weeks away!  SAQA's (Studio Art Quilt Associates) national conference is coming to Portland, April 30 through May 2.  All the Oregon members are excited to have the conference in our own part of the world.  These conferences are a great time to connect with any folks whose names we have seen in publications over the years but never met in person and reconnect with old acquaintances.  Many new friendships are made and everyone goes home re-energized to keep creating and networking.

The little quilt pictured above is my donation to the fund-raising auction that will be held the weekend of the conference.  It is small, just 6" by 8" and will have a mat around it for the auction.  I called it Fiberlandia in honor of the conference being held here in Willamette Valley country.  This could easily be a scene from the Hood River Valley, just east of Portland, as well.  I'm hoping the bidding will be high on this piece since I made it to complement the 12 badges I am also making for the local volunteers to wear.

These are even smaller than the donation quilt.  They will be about 3" square when finished.  I'm still trying to decide how I will put the lettering on.  I'd like to have it on a piece of white silk organza (attached just on the edges) so it could be removed later if the recipient wanted it to keep as a little piece of art.  I'll see how that goes once the main stitching is finished on each piece.  Hopefully, they will be desirable enough to generate a lot of bidding on the larger piece.

Sunday, February 15, 2015

The Classroom is Open!


Yes, I am up and running.  This is Judy and Viki, my first students in the new space.  We had a blast doing Thermofax screen printing.  I had to think hard about buying a thermofax machine but I think it will get used often enough to make it worth the purchase.  Judy used a design from one of her machine embroidery programs that she plans to combine with stitching. Viki worked with some beautiful hand-dyed fabrics to further enhance them.


Here  are a few pictures of the classroom in (kind of) magazine photo state.  It can't be too tidy or I can't find anything!

 
Right behind me is an area with a small sink and washer and dryer for working with dying projects.  I hung a quilt there that was made by Terry Howard Grant called "When It Rains I make My Own Sunshine".  I will have to protect it with a plastic sheet when working with paints or dye.


I even have a pretty little powder room.


It is going to be a really fun space to work in as my own studio as well as being a delightful classroom space.  I will try to post  pictures of what this room looked like before it was transformed by my dear contractor husband.  It has taken about 6 months of work on his part, in the beginning, and then on my part getting it organized.  
 
Here is how I used the closet that formerly had wooden bi-fold doors across the front.  I love these baskets from Ikea for storing fabric.  They get a little heavy it I stack the fabric too high but it is very easy to see what is in each one.  I organize according to color mostly but hand-dyed and themed fabrics also get their own basket.


Watch for more projects and classroom fun to come!

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

3 Days Left!


A Color Runs Through It ends on February 6 at the Maude Kerns Art Center.  It feels like a short month. I visited the show three times but the last time was the best.  I was there when it was quiet and I could really take the time to stop and study individual pieces.  I noticed texture and stitching details I hadn't seen until that day.  Everyone did such lovely work and I know they worked hard to have at least 10 pieces for the show.  Here's a mini tour in case you can't visit in person.

The image above is a selection of Deb Sorem's Green series.  Below are a few of Paulette Landers' Red pieces.

Diane English had Purple and Georgia French had Yellow.

This is a wonderful shot of my Blue pieces with friends.  Georgia is in the center.  There is also a long shot of my additional five pieces that are all 12 x 12 inches.

 I hope you were able to actually go and see our work because pictures can never capture all the details.  If not, maybe this mini tour was enjoyable, too.

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

A Color Runs Through It

Our show A Color Runs Through It opened last Friday evening with a nicely attended reception. The other four artists in the show with me are Georgia French, Diane English, Deb Sorem and Paulette Landers.  Each of us worked mainly with a specific color.  Georgia picked yellow, Diane picked purple, Deb had green and Paulette chose red.  My color was blue.  We also could use the color directly across the color wheel from our chosen color, plus black and white.  For me, that meant orange.  The image above is the third piece I made in the series and I called it Canyonlands.

Since I was supposed to be working mainly with blue, I thought Canyonlands leaned a little too far toward the orange shades.  So, I made this next piece called Moonrise.  Orange takes more of a back seat in this piece even though the moon itself is the focal point of the piece.  From a distance it does read blue.

My last piece in this series is Winter Solstice.  I love working with snow scenes.  It always makes me feel calm in the way that the world becomes hushed and quiet when a layer of fresh snow absorbs all sounds.  I like to experience the feel of the cold in the scene while working all snug and warm in my studio.

Here are some detail shots of the three quilts pictures above.


In my next post I will post pictures of the 5 smaller pieces I made at the gallery's request.  I am also going back to the gallery to take some pictures of the whole show.  I was so busy chatting at the opening, I forgot to take any pictures that evening!

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Coming Back to Earth

Well, moving sure took it's toll on my blogging.  I see I haven't posted since May which was about the time our house went on the market.  It has been a whirlwind ever since.  Believe it or not, things are actually looking calmer as the end of December approaches.

I have been working in the studio in spite of all the moving uproar, working hard!  I am part of a show at the Maude Kerns Art Center in Eugene for the month of January with a group of five art quilters.  We each chose a main color to work with in all our pieces.  From that we were allowed to use the color across the color wheel from our chosen color and any neutral colors.  The kicker?  We each needed to provide five main quilts, plus five other pieces, which could be old work.  However, in my crazy head, I decided that even the additional five pieces needed to be new work. 

I chose the color Blue. That has meant working with Orange as well.  The piece pictured above is called Altitude.  It is a pretty obvious use of blue and orange.  A second piece, below, is a more subtle rendition of that color combination.  I called this one Fallow Fields. The five main pieces each measure 24" wide by 30" high.
Here is a small detail of the larger piece.  I had not yet finished the hand stitched rain lines when this was taken but I think you can see where I'm going. 
Next post will show more pieces.  I am currently working on #8.  
 Boy, it feels good to be "back"!